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Pella Windows Reviews

Read 45 Pella windows reviews on their most popular options, including the 250, 350, 450, Thermastar, Impervia, ProLine, Designer, Architect window series.

Have a question for our site editors, Dane and Tim? Email them and let them answer your specific project questions. Make sure to include your email address so they can get back to you directly (we never use or sell your email, we promise.)

Please note, our website is not affiliated with this window manufacturer.

Click to find the model you want reviews on. For general reviews, see the last link.

Pella Windows Prices | 250 Series | 350 Series | Thermastar Series

Impervia Series | ProLine Series | Designer Series | Architect Series

Patio Doors | General Reviews


Editor's Pella Window Review

Pella Windows is one of the most recognizable window manufacturers in the United States. In fact, Pella, Andersen and Simonton Vinyl Windows are the big 3 when it comes to name and brand recognition in the replacement window market. Of the 3, Pella gets the most customer service complaints - usually for one reason, Pella vinyl replacement windows have not been very good in terms of quality and performance.

Pella Vinyl Windows

In the past, Pella vinyl replacement windows have weathered a good chunk of criticism, much of it leveled at the Thermastar vinyl window (sold mainly in the big box stores such as Lowes and Home Depot.) The Pella Thermastar window is usually found near or at the bottom of the Consumer Reports Best Replacement Windows list, year after year. The Thermastar is not a well built vinyl window and most consumers would do well to consider another option. The Thermastar has since been renamed The Pella Encompass Series, although consumers still tells us that they find the Thermastar model sold in some pockets of the country.

The company introduced two new vinyl window series in 2012, the Pella 250 and the Pella 350. The 350 includes some added upgrades from the 250, but in general these window series are much better in terms of design, quality and durability compared to the Thermastar. In terms of how they stack of to other vinyl windows, they should be considered a middle of the road window, instead of a top tiered vinyl window. Click to discover our picks for the best vinyl replacement windows. One nice thing about Pella is they are going to be available in all parts of the country and have a large distribution channel and overall company stability.

Pella Fiberglass Windows

Pella sells the Impervia, which is a fiberglass window that should run similarly in price to the Marvin Infinity series. Most contractors are going to rate the Infinity model higher than the Impervia in terms of construction and overall quality. Some contractors have commented that the Impervia feels flimsy and not as well made as they would like.

Pella Wood Clad Windows

Pella is really known for their wood clad windows and this is where they shine. They make some beautiful wood clad windows and offer some nice wood species options such as alder and mahogany. Their 450 Series is the builder wood (previously the ProLine), probably comparable in price and quality to the Andersen 200 window. The two models that get great reviews are the Designer and Architect Series, completely custimizable, great looking and well made. They are going to be expensive, but if you can offer to purchase a top end wood clad window and have your heart set on it, this is an excellent option.

Pella Windows Warranty

Pella offers a pretty nice warranty, limited lifetime on vinyl and wood, although their wood clad product components are only warrantied for 10 years. The company covers the labor costs of replacement for 2 years, while most other companies only cover a single year. We always recommend that you read the warranty for the specific product you are purchasing to see what limitations and exclusions apply - there are always a whole big list of them.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2015

Have a question for our site editors, Dane or Tim? Email them and let them answer your specific project questions. Make sure to include your email address so they can get back to you directly (we never use or sell your email, we promise.)


Pella Wood Clad Windows

I have a Pella clad fixed window 72 X 96 architecture series with muntin patterns of 3W X 4H. The clad outside at the corners where it is put together has pulled apart and caused moisture to come in and the wood has decayed inside at the bottom. Of course Pella says it is due to my sprinklers but it does rain. I live in south Louisiana with high humidity and rain along with high temperatures. The window is original to the home that was built in 1999. I have Pella windows throughout my home. I am looking at not replacing it with another Pella. I am researching Marvin, Kolbe, Windsor and Jen Weld windows. What are the positives and negatives of each? Who has the best warranty? Thank you for your advise.

Melanie - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Response]

Hi Melanie, sorry to hear about your window issues. I'm curious if you've ever considered a high end vinyl window with an interior wood grain finish. The problem I see with real wood windows is that you are going to have the same issue of contraction and expansion 10 years down the road if you put in another wood window. The newer wood grain finishes on the vinyl windows are pretty impressive. I know there is a Sunrise rep out of New Orleans that you could call and get a bid from. The Sunrise Restorations is one of the best vinyl windows on the market and has some very nice interior wood grain options.

The other option I've been recommending a bit more these days is the Jeld Wen wood windows with Auralast. The Auralast is a wood preservative that goes on the exposed wood (the exterior of the window is a fiberglass) and carries a lifetime warranty. The window looks really good and according to reps it stands up to the elements.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2016



Pella 250 Windows Reviews


Editor's Pella 250 Window Review

Pella doesn't have the best reputation when it comes to vinyl windows. For instance, the Pella Thermastar seems to have locked in the lowest rated vinyl window on the Consumer Reports Replacement Windows list for the past few years running. The Pella 250 is just two slots up from this and gets a 61 rating out of 100. I'm not a big proponent of Consumer Reports list in general (the 3rd highest vinyl window on their list is the American Craftsman 70 Series, a thoroughly unforgettable window in my opinion.)

The Pella 250 and 350 series window are a good improvement from their previous vinyl window offerings (which includes the ThermaStar). However, the windows still us a poor sill design and are glazed with a PPG Intercept spacer, which is kind of dated at this point. This isn't to say that these windows are bad, just that they aren't a top quality vinyl window.

The problem I see with the Pella 250 vinyl window is that it is often sold for a premium price because it carries the Pella label and consumers recognize the name and assume that the windows are high quality. While this is often the case with Pella's wood windows, it's not so much with their vinyl windows. I'd say the Pella 250 is a low to middle mid range vinyl window. If I were in the market for vinyl replacement windows, I would continue my search past the flashy Pella marketing. Click to see the Editor's picks for top vinyl windows to see


Pella 250 Vinyl Windows vs Sunrise Essentials

Sunrise Essentials vs Pella 250 vinyl windows. Which is best?

Brian - Homeowner - from 2017

[Site Editor's Answer]

While the Sunrise Essentials isn't the best window out there, its a decent window with a .30 U-factor and a .10 air infiltration rate. This is going to be better than Pella's entry level window, the 250 model. If it were my house, I would go with the Sunrise Essentials. If at all possible I would try and stretch into the Sunrise window (sometimes called the standard or classic model). Pella has definitely stepped up their game with the 250 and 350, but I still don't think they can hold a candle to the top tier vinyl window manufacturers.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2017


Pella 250 Window vs Polaris Ultraweld

Pella 250 series vinyl windows vs Polaris Ultraweld. Let me know what you think.

Robert - Homeowner - from 2017

[Site Editor's Answer]

The Polaris Ultraweld over the Pella 250 by a mile. Maybe even a mile and a half :)

Dane - Site Editor - from 2017


Pella 250 Windows vs Mercury Excelum

Received your msg, forget Pella, took a second look, I'll pass. however do give me your opinion of Mercury Excelum. I've attached 2 PDFs with some specs, compare to American Craftsman or window world, OR Pella 250 , but No installs. ME made nearby in Ct, can get at a local Non big box lumberyard, free delivery, and done business with 20 plus years, they recommend ME.

I'm installing the 11 windows myself, filling the cavities, caulking well, trimming the interior trim, and leaving the storm windows in place, so as not to change the looks of this huge house of 30 + windows, 3 stories high. You opinion is important to me that I make the correct choice. Thank You in advance.

Rick - Homeowner - from 2017

[Site Editor's Answer]

Rick, I agree that the Pella 250 vinyl window is probably one you should pass on. It just doesn't offer the quality that you should be looking for in a vinyl window.

American Craftsman is probably worse than Pella in terms of overall quality so let's toss that one as well.

I know very little about the Mercury Excelum brand, but I did take a look at the brochure you included.

The 3/4 inch IG low-e double hung (40" by 63" test size) gets .27 u-value, .28 shgc, .52 VT, and a .04 air infiltration. These are good numbers. The company has been around since 1953, so they obviously make a product that contractors and builders have been using for decades. I can't speak to the individual parts because they aren't listed in the brochure.

The numbers for the Mercury Advantage series (I'm not quite sure if this a lower end series, their website is unclear on this point) were decidedly less impressive, particularly the .21 air infiltration. Anything above .15 causes me some concern.

You are obviously limited in what you have access to as a DIYer and I think that the Mercury Excelum looks like a good choice -- I don't know what price you are getting, but if you have access to a vinyl window that is offering a .04 AI I think you should feel comfortable in terms of quality.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2017


Pella 250 Series vs. Vantage Pointe 6500E

I need some advice with regard to replacing some wood windows. We have received pricing quotes from Lowes and Home Depot for various VINYL brands. Specifically, Vantage Pointe 6500E, Pella Thermastar and Pella 250 Series. We reside on the East Coast and have a limited budget because of having to replace approximately 18 WOOD windows. Since the estimates have been extremely high, we are looking to contract with a local company in the 22407 zip code area. I would appreciate your recommendation on a window brand.

Bernice - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Response]

Bernice, none of the windows you mentioned are super high quality, but the Vantage Pointe 6500E option is probably your best bet. The Pella 250 would be next in line, not a bad vinyl window, but perhaps on the lower end of the mid range. The Pella Thermastar is one of my least favorite vinyl windows out there. Check out our replacement windows by Consumer Reports to verify (I actually don't think Consumer Reports gets much right besides their score on the Thermastar.)

I think you should at least get a couple of quotes from local dealers, not HD and Lowes, although with your tight budget it might be tough. The two brands I would recommend are Okna and Sunrise, both of which should be available in Virginia.

Since you are on a budget, I would say look up companies that offer these window brands and call them up and tell them you want a quote on their entry level window window, the Okna 400 series and the Sunrise Bainbridge option. These windows are going to be MUCH better than the windows you have selected. I'm not sure they will be in your budget, but I will say that long term they may be the cheaper alternative, especially if you are going to be staying in your home for a long time.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella 250 Windows vs Simonton Vantage Point

My wife and I recently received quotes by a Pella representative and a Home Depot representative. How do the Pella 250 and 350 compare to the Simonton Vantage Point 6500?

Dave - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Response]

Dave, I would have to give the edge to the Pella 250/350, but not by much. Both of these vinyl windows are right in that mid range option (perhaps a bit on the low side of that mid range). The reason that most consumers like the HD Simonton Vantage Point 6500 is the price, while many consumers go with Pella for the name (usually mistakenly). Pella has definitely stepped up their game with the 250 and 350 series, but they are often going to run more than something like the VantagePointe.

The big issue I have with HD is the installation quality with the use of subcontractors who are paid a very low rate for their services. I don't find this to be a recipe for quality (certainly not always the case, but I've heard enough stories to know it can be true).

I would be curious to know how these compare to one another in terms of price? I would have to assume that the Pella option was quite a bit more. If it were me, I would get a couple more quotes to before I pulled the trigger. Where are you located, I could make a couple of suggestions if you'd like.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella 250 Series vs. Champion Windows

Do you have an opinion of Pella 250 series v. a href="http://www.replacementwindowsreviews.co/pricing/champion-windows-prices.html">Champion replacement windows? I am looking for double hung replacement windows with installation. I have talked with Pella and Champion reps, as well as Renewal by Andersen (very expensive).

I am trying to compare vinyl double hung replacement windows with installation. I am finding few manufacturers who have installers within the company, or even long-time relationships with installers.

I have found and received estimates from Champion and Pella (250 series) and also for Renewal by Andersen fibrex windows (very expensive). The Champion warranty seems better, but also seems too good to be true – why would they agree to replace a window damaged by a rock thrown by a mower? For a trip fee?

Do you have an opinion on the comparative quality and reliability of the Champion and Pella 250 series windows? Thank you.

Betsy - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Response]

The Pella 250 and their 350 are certainly better than their previous generation ov vinyl windows, but honestly there are much better places to go for vinyl windows than Pella. Champion makes a stronger vinyl window in my opinion and they do their own installation, which means they know the window well and are well versed in the little tricks that often go into installing a specific model of vinyl window. The one criticism of Champion from some consumers is that the company charges a premium price for a good (but not great) product. This will certainly depend on the salesperson you get etc. The window breakage provision is a good one and they can offer it because they are a big company and have lots of window parts and glass on hand.

Assuming you like the price from Champion, I'd say go for it. Please let me know how it works for you!

Dane - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella 250 Model vs Soft-Lite Windows

I'm replacing 30 year old aluminum windows and am definitely looking at vinyl as my go to selection. We currently have a bid for the Pella 250 window (installed at $575 per window), the Vista Platinum window (installed at $590 per window). I'm expecting a bid on the Wincore 700 window and I may get a bid from Soft-Lite.

I've done lots of research but it's all starting to get a bit muddled, there is a lot of confusing information out there! I'd like to get your opinion(s).

Robbie - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Response]

Robbie, here is my two cents. First off, you should definitely get the bids from Wincore and Soft-lite. Soft-Lite is going to be the best of the bunch, although they have lots of models so this has to be taken with a grain of salt. Their top end vinyl windows - the Elements, Imperial LS and Pro are all good windows, especially the first two. The Vista Platinum series is decent and I like the 7700 window from Wincore. They are probably on par with the Soft-Lite Pro, which is an older model from Soft-Lite. The Pella 250 is a tier below these other series and therefore not worth the price you were quoted in my opinion.

I would suggest getting all of your quotes and then emailing me back and let me know the numbers and we'll go from there!

Tim - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella 250 Series Reviews

I'm in the process of getting some quotes to replace all (21) windows on my house. The original windows are aluminum frame, single pane. So far I got a quote from Gulf Coast Windows (extremely high), Pella (for their 250 series) and Renewal by Andersen, which was $34,000. To me it seems quite expensive but I really do not know what would be a fair price. Pella quote around $14,000 for the same project using the 250 series. The Pella 250 is a vinyl window and the few reviews that I found weren't good. Any advice on price range and good mid-level windows frames and companies would be really appreciate. BTH, I live in Houston.

Damian - Homeowner - from 2014

[Contractor Response]

Pella definitely is not known for their high quality vinyl windows, although they have made some definite strides in the past several years to improve the overall quality in the 250 and 350 series windows. Both of these windows use the pocket sill however, which I think most installers would agree is not a very good design feature.

Most of the bigger players in the industry have seen the market share of vinyl windows grow over the last decade and obviously want to part of it. I'd still be hesitant to tell my customers to go with Pella vinyl windows, not because I think they are poor in quality, but instead that there are so many good vinyl options out there.

Barry - Contractor - from 2014


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Pella 350 Windows Reviews


Editor's Pella 350 Windows Reviews

Pella doesn't have the best reputation when it comes to vinyl windows. For instance, the Pella Thermastar seems to have locked in the lowest rated vinyl window on the Consumer Reports Replacement Windows list for the past few years running. The Pella 250 is just two slots up from this and gets a 61 rating out of 100. I'm not a big proponent of Consumer Reports list in general (the 3rd highest vinyl window on their list is the American Craftsman 70 Series, a thoroughly unforgettable window in my opinion.)

The Pella 350 window is a good improvement over their previous vinyl windows such as the ThermaStar). However, the windows still us a poor sill design and are glazed with a PPG Intercept spacer, which is kind of dated at this point. This isn't to say that these windows are bad, just that they aren't a top quality vinyl window.


Pella 350 Series vs Vinylmax Edison

Hi Dane, my husband and I are looking for replacement windows for our home in St Paul, Minnesota. We have 15 windows to replace- 2 are large picture windows and the others are sliders (6) or casements (7). We are looking at vinyl windows & full frame replacements. We've gotten window + installation quotes from Pella for the 250/350 series (just over $30k), Home Depot for the Andersen 100 series ($20k), and a local company for the Vinylmax Edison series ($23k).

We've ruled out Pella (too expensive, don't like the windows) and Home Depot (don't like the windows). We were very impressed with the company who quoted us on the Vinylmax windows & we like the window itself, but the price seems steep compared to other quotes we've seen online. In your opinion, is $23k way too expensive for this project?

Thanks for the gut check. Your site has been super helpful as we have been going through this process.

Laura - Homeowner - from 2017

[Site Editor's Answer]

Hi Laura, I agree that the Pella quote is way too high, especially considering that the Vinylmax Edison window is better than the Pella 350 window, in my opinion. The Andersen 100 is a decent window, but I would rate the Edison as better. In terms of a fair price, I can't say. But I can offer a couple of suggestions to help you find out.

One, are the bids broken out between the windows and the labor? This can help you separate how much the companies are charging for the install and should give you an overall idea of what the market price is for the installation.

Two, get a few more bids and compare these, asking for the bids to be broken down into windows and labor. (Some companies will do this, and some won't, but it's always good to ask.) I have a feeling that the Edison quote is probably right on, but you won't know until you get one or two more. The HD bid is probably lower on the install and you are right to toss it because HD typically pays such a bad rate to their subs that they aren't giving you a proper and thorough installation in some cases.

Three, you will want to see if the Edison bid can go any lower. Here's an article that may be helpful.

Four, you could always buy the Andersen 100 at HD and find your own installer. Someone who is local and has a great reputation for quality installs. This is often the cheapest approach but its a bit more hands on. There is a lot of transparency here because HD tells you exactly what they charge for the window and so you are getting only HD's markup, not the contractor's mark up (assuming they are marking it up).

Dane - Site Editor - from 2017


Pella 350 vs Marvin Integrity

I am replacing/enlarging the south facing double hung window in my kitchen. I want the new window to measure 48x54 & going from left to right be 25% slider, 50%stationary, 25% slider. My quotes are $971 for a a href="http://www.replacementwindowsreviews.co/company/marvin-windows-reviews.html">Marvin Integrity Wood-Ultrex double for just a double slider & a Pella 350 series sliding window-vent right/fixed/vent left-in I believe vinyl for $1317 & an MI custom 3 light slider the same as I described I want for $310. I know I'm not getting any of these. What window companies should I be looking at, what are your recommendations for the manufacturers of a window like this?

Similarly I am looking for sliding French doors or swing in French doors to replace my current in swinging French doors going from the dining room to a screened porch. The rough opening is 129 inches & currently my unobstructed opening with both doors open is 6ft. I'd like bifold doors which I know I can't afford. Next I'd take 3 or 4 sliders & last new in swinging French doors. The quotes I have are; $5958 for a Marvin Integrity Ultrex wood OXXO configuration, $4402 for a Jeld-Wen Auralast Siteline wood sliding patio door-OXXO as well, $6057 for a Pella 350 series quad sliding door-fixed, vent, vent, fixed 10" smaller than my rough opening, $6146 for a Pella Architect quad sliding same config 13" smaller than my rough opening, $9843 for a Pella Architect inswing door-sidelight- double inswing-sidelight & $2200 for a Tucker 2/0, 6/0 dble, 2/0 wood, full view double slider. What's your thoughts on these & suggestions on where to get a good quality window & door system that will last for a decent price? Thank you so much for your help.

Patricia - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Answer]

Patricia, I like the Marvin Integrity, but it sounds like you have already exes out this option or that they don't offer the configuration you are looking for. The Pella 350 series is a decent vinyl window, but I tend to think that Pella is overpriced in most cases -- however the 350 series is their best vinyl window to date. I've never recommended an MI window and I'm not going to start now.

In North Carolina, you have some solid options out there -- these are the brands I like and often recommend - Okna, Sunrise, Zen, Simonton and Champion. Find a local company that sells these brands and get a bid on the project. While they are out, ask them to give you a bid on the patio door as well. If they don't provide custom doors that will work for your home, ask them for a good local recommendation and call the recommendation up.

As far as the doors go, I stick by my recommendations up top. ProVia and Jeld Wen both make good doors. I would definitely consider the Jeld Wen door bid as it is the cheapest of the bunch and the aura last wood comes with a lifetime warranty. As well, try a bid from Home Depot on their 400 series or their 200 series (I can't remember what is offered in which series in terms of in swing or outswing). You'll have to hire your own contractor to put in the door, but their prices are pretty tough to beat.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella 350 vs Simonton Windows

I have quotes on vinyl replacement windows by Simonton and Pella that are within $400. Which would you recommend. Thanks

Kathy - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

Kathy, the answer to this question really depends on which window models or series you have quotes on and what glass packages are included with each. Both Simonton and Pella make some very mediocre windows and they make some good windows as well. The Pella 250 and 350 series are okay vinyl windows, probably on par with the mid range Simonton Reflections 5300 Model. If you provide me with a bit more information, I can give you a much more specific answer. Thanks!

Dane - Site Editor - from 2015


Pella vs Marvin Fiberglass Windows

We need to replace 32 windows in our house (replacing Caradco windows, approx. 20 years old - 50% have broken seals). Looking at Pella Vinyl 350 series & Marvin Infinity or Integrity. Any thoughts on which is best. We are looking for good quality, best bang for the dollar. Thanks.

Russ - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

Russ, I would put the Marvin Integrity and Infinity firmly over the Pella 350 series for overall design and craftsmanship. I happen to like the Infinity over the Integrity model, but take a look at them side by side yourself (assuming whoever is selling you the window carries both models) to check out the differences between the two. The Infinity Everwood (interior wood grain, not real wood) is pretty darn realistic looking and comes in 8 different wood species that can match your interior color scheme nicely. Here is a link to explore the differences in more details.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015






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Pella Thermastar Windows Reviews


Pella Hurricane Windows Reviews

Pella manufactures the DP50 Thermastar single hung that should be approved for Florida coastal code, I believe its code compliant for Miami Dade. The single hung is easier to get to pass code, plus in Florida people don't open and close their windows in the summer because everyone runs A/C. Thermastar isn't the best window out there by any stretch but it carries a lifetime warranty and is a good low end alternative.

Donald - Contractor - from 2010






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Pella Impervia Windows Reviews


Pella Impervia Windows vs Soft-Lite And Okna

We have talked to 5 window replacement businesses and are down to choosing between three. We live in DC suburbs, and based on what I am reading, we apparently pay a different price than other areas (i.e. much higher). The job is 13 windows and one 6 foot slider. Townhouse is contemporary, wood siding, with SW exposure and wonderful light in the living room. Current windows are original to 1981, metal, double pane but the wind blows through.

Windows include seven 30.5 X 70 windows. There is conflicting information on whether four of these need tempered glass on the bottom Four are 10 from the floor, 2 of these are in a second story BR. One company says we don?t need the tempered glass because the total area of the bottom window is less than 9 sq ft. Two suggested we have the tempered glass for safety, regardless of the area. One slider over the bathtub will be tempered glass

Estimates include the following:

Company 1: Okna 500 $15,516, installed (with additional discounts for cash, putting up a sign, signing day he came out... we didn't)

Okna 800 $16, 491 (same discounts) Very busy molding on the outside of this one, though ratings are excellent.

Tempered glass in Bathroom only

Company 2: Soft-Lite Pro $12,665 (haven't asked him re: additional discounts yet for the Pro or the LS)

Soft-Lite LS $13,725

Pella Impervia $13,995 (we saw Pella windows, didn't care for them, and energy ratings are better for the vinyl)

Tempered glass in four bottom windows

This company was the only one that got that I want to maximize the glass opening to maintain the light in our home. The other two kept telling me to compare the VT, which is part but not all of it. He is going to come out again with his installer to see if they can use a dremel saw to open a bit more of the inside frame allowing a larger window insert and larger glass area.

Company 3: Ideal Majestic Energy Green Package $11,160 (check or credit card price $10,335)

Tempered glass in four bottom windows.

All companies to cap exterior wood around windows with aluminum, all include the thruvision screens.

I have a spreadsheet to compare the energy ratings, warranties, etc. but may have overdone this and we may be in the area of overthinking this. Any of these will be so much better than what we have now, but we hope to be here at least 10 more years or longer. Any thoughts? Thanks.

Ruth - Homeowner - from 2017

[Site Editor's Answer]

Ruth, company 1 and 2 are offering some great windows. The Ideal Majestic is just an okay window, while the other windows are excellent.

If it were me, I would go with the Imperial LS. The Pella Impervia isn't a very good fiberglass window in my opinion.

Okna is a great window but the Soft-Lite is comparable. The Imperial LS is an excellent window and seems like the best priced of the bunch.

The bid is hopefully negotiable, so perhaps use the Ideal bid to see if you can get company 2 to come down on their price. Something like if you can come close to this other bid for $11,136, I will sign today. Take a bit of time and see if you can find the floor of the quote.

Good luck!

Dane - Site Editor - from 2017


Pella Impervia Contractor Review

I would place the Pella Impervia range at the very bottom of the fiberglass window options. I feel they are bad performers and are not visually appealing in any way. There are so many great window options available, this is definitely not one of them.

Charles - Installer – 2012


Pella Impervia Design Complaint

My thoughts on this Pella window are not very positive, in fact I think these windows are low quality, have poor energy ratings and are badly designed. If you're looking for a window then go for the higher end vinyl options, these will never lose their color, they are built to last and won't peel or warp. Names to consider include Gorell, Okna, SoftLite and Sunrise.

George - Installer - from 2012


Pella Windows Reviews 2012

The only place Pella is better than other brands is in their advertising department. The vinyl and Pella fiberglass windows are both terrible. You're paying a premium price for marketing, not for good windows. Inline makes a good window as well as patio doors, and ProVia is a good choice too. BTW, these recommendations are not my top personal choices, just the best among the brands you are considering. My top picks (if available in your area) would be the Okna 500, Gorell 5300, Sunrise Restorations or the Soft-Lite Imperial or Elements.

Wayne - Contractor - from 2012

Read additional Soft-Lite windows reviews.


Pella Impervia vs. Soft-Lite Elements

I have spent a few weeks getting window replacement quotes together and could really do with some advice. I am drawn to two of the quotes, one is for the SoftLite Elements (the vinyl option) and the other is the Pella Impervia (the fiberglass option). The windows are the same in that they are both argon filled, double hung and double paned and pricing wise there isn't much of a difference at all. I believe the fiberglass windows will require some maintenance, where the vinyl don't. Any advice is appreciated.

Bill - Homeowner 2010

[Contractor Response]

I would recommend you go with the Soft-Lite option, if these are the only windows that appeal to you from the quotes you received. I cannot recommend the Pella Impervia windows, I have not had good experiences with them as windows and with the company as a whole. SoftLite tick all the boxes. Have a look at the Imperial LS range from SoftLite, they are similar to the Elements, but quality wise, they are much better.

Harry - Contractor - 2010

Read additional Soft-Lite windows reviews.


Pella Impervia vs Sunrise Windows

When I purchased my home I had a mixture of Pella Impervia and Sunrise Restoration windows. I preferred the Sunrise, but when I looked for replacement windows only Pella could match the color scheme I wanted, so I went with them.

I did do my research before coming to a decision and found the Sunrise Restoration windows to have a fiberglass reinforcement which reduced sagging, I was concerned about some of their other ranges that didn't have this reinforcement in place. Marvin was obviously a great window, but the local dealer couldn't supply them. Eventually I chose the Pella Impervia and must say overall I am very happy. They are quality windows and affordable and have blended into my home beautifully.

David - Homeowner - from 2010






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Pella ProLine Windows Reviews


Pella ProLine Windows Bid

Hi Tim, I recently received an estimate for full frame replacement for 4 double hung ProLine windows and 2 ProLine awning vent windows for basically $10k in Philadelphia (direct from Pella sales). Wanted to get gut check as to whether or not that is a reasonable estimate. Thanks.

KC- Homeowner - from 2017

[Site Editor's Answer]

KC, the Pella Proline window is their entry level wood window, also sometimes called their 450 Series, depending on where you purchase from. Based on the numbers you are talking, i would surmise you are paying roughly $1000 per window, not counting installation, which is too much in my opinion for a non top-of-the-line wood clad window. Before you go spending $10K on 6 windows, you really need to get a few more bids.

For instance, while I'm not a big fan of Jeld Wen vinyl windows, they actually make a wood clad window in which the wood comes with a lifetime warranty (compare this to the Pella which probably comes with a 15 or 20 year warranty). Jeld Wen uses an aura last wood treatment that allows them to offer the lifetime warranty and the windows are usually like $300 to $500 in the big box stores, depending on all the bells and whistles. At $500 a pop for installation (the very top of what you should be spending for new construction), you'd be looking at $6K at most - and you get a lifetime warranty. There is an argument to be made that Jeld Wen is not Pella and I would agree with the overall statement, except that you are buying Pellas low end wood window.

Other wood windows to consider include the Marvin Integrity (with the real wood interiro), the Andersen 400 series, and the Marvin Ultimate wood clad window.

I would be remiss if I didn't suggest that you look at a top-tier vinyl window with a wood veneer. Sunrise and Okna both make excellent looking windows that come in interior veneers -- these top tier vinyl windows blow the doors off any wood window in terms of performance, require no maintenance, and won't break down over time the way that an organic material such as wood will. They should run in the $600 to $900 per window installed for new construction. If nothing else, you should take a look to rule out.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2017


Pella ProLine vs Sunrise Windows

I have a bid on Pella Pro Line wood windows. They are very nice looking windows, but I'm worried about rotting, which I've read in numerous forums happens to wood. There is no sealant in the corners and I'm worried that moisture would get in. One of my neighbors just got a bid for Sunrise windows - not sure which models, but I was wondering whether they are good or not?

Brian - Homeowner - from 2014

[Contractor Response]

I've installed Pella windows going on nearly 30 year and have all the training certification etc. I love wood clad windows, but they have some downsides to be sure - rotting and mediocre rating at the top of the list. Honestly, the Sunrise vinyl window will be a better option in both of these regards (perhaps not their entry level window, but the standard frame and all other upgraded models.) As far as wood windows go, I think the big manufacturers need to stand behind their products and warranty their frames and sashes on the wood windows for 20 years. Then you would provide some confidence to the consumer.

Wayne - Contractor - from 2014

[Contractor Response]

I think the Sunrise is probably your best bet, but I agree with you on how nice the ProLine series looks. You will always have a better warranty on inorganic substrates such as fiberglass and vinyl as opposed to wood. Sunrise makes a good window - not their low end window, but everything else.

Holland - Contractor - from 2014

[Contractor Response]

I always tell my customers that they should compare vinyl and wood clad for instance because the materials are so different. First decide what frame is right for you and then get a few bids from companies that sell that type of window so you can compare apples to apples. Having said that, I agree the a good vinyl window from Sunrise is a better value than any wood window because there is always the worry about rot. I have sold Pella windows before and was impressed with certain things from the company, and not so keen on others - thus no longer selling them.

Dennis - Contractor - from 2014


Pella vs Kolbe Windows

If you're looking at Pellas and Kolbes, the Pella is probably a little cheaper, but not by much. I think the Kolbes are better by a big enough margin to be worth the higher cost. I had 20 double hung wood windows put in about 15 years ago and they are still like new.

Guy - Homeowner in New Jersey - from 2011

[Contractor Response]

Kolbes are definitely better. Pella is better known, but people in the trades know Kolbe. Better post-sale service, better build quality, just a better choice all around.

Tim - Contractor - from 2011

[2nd Response]

I honestly am not impressed by either of these. Kolbe to me is just an unimpressive mediocre window. Pellas, though, are garbage. Even their top-line Architectural series are lousy. The showroom models look nice, but when you get your windows all the details are off. Hardware is on crooked, miter joints are bad. The Pellas I put on my house are decent, but only because I put a ton of work into fixing them after they came. As delivered, they weren't something that could be put on a house.

Mark - Contractor - from 2011






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Pella Designer Windows Reviews


Pella Designer Series Reviews

We're upgrading our town home with new windows and patio doors. I'm looking at the Pella Designer Series. I want something that will last at least 10 years or so, I don't want low-grade windows, but I also don't want to throw away my money.

Don - Homeowner in Alabama - from 2011

[Contractor Response]

The Pella Designer is nice looking, but stay away from their lower end stuff. Also, they have pretty bad customer service if you do run into a problem.

Holland - Contractor - from 2011






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Pella Architect Windows Reviews


Pella Architect vs Marvin Ultimate Series

We are building a house and are wanting to install black exterior frames, wood interior. Our builder has suggested Pella architect series. A friend suggested we price Marvin’s line. Their salesman suggested that the Pella architect series black frame had a problem with fading.

Have you heard of problems with fading with the black exterior frames and how do rate the Pella windows vs Marvin?

Which Marvin line should we look at? We do want a wood interior. The Pella has an aluminum exterior.

Thank you,

Jennifer- Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Answer]

Jennifer, all frames will fade over time, that's just how the sun works. I've never heard that Pella fades more or less than any other company. Marvin carries two real wood interior options, the integrity with the wood interior or the Ultimate wood series. I would get a quote on both of them if I were you. The Pella Architect series is very nice, but it isn't cheap. I also like the Andersen 400 series. Jeld Wen makes a wood window that comes with a lifetime warranty (compared to most wood windows that come with a 20 year warranty) and I believe they offer quite a number of exterior frame colors.

One option I have to mention is going with a high end vinyl with an interior wood laminate. Although it's not for everyone, the faux wood grain is pretty impressive these days, especially from the top end manufacturers like Okna, Soft-Lite, and Sunrise. It should be pretty straight forward to get a quote from a local dealer and hopefully they can bring samples of the wood laminates so you can see for yourself. These are going to be much more energy efficient and cheaper as well. If you upgrade to the metal hardware, these windows are very nice looking.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella Architect Series Window Review

I was about to order Jeld-Wen windows but decided to take the quote with me to a Pella showroom. I was surprised by how much nicer the Pellas are as far as looks and quality - plus they are less expensive than the Jeld-Wens. I ended up buying the Pella Architect window and feel they are really well made. The Jeld-Wens we looked at are rolled aluminum and they can dent. The Pellas have extruded aluminum clad wood so they won't dent and water can't get in.

Danny - Homeowner - from 2011






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Pella Patio Door Reviews


Pella Patio Door Complaint

I had Pella patio doors installed in my home when it was built 9 years ago, and I have regretted it ever since. The patio door gets so much moisture on it, the varnish is pealing off. I have replaced two of the windows due to the outside pane breaking and I currently need to replace another one but I decided to wait for another one to break so I could at least save on the delivery cost. All of the windows gather moisture at the frames so I assume it is only a matter of time until the windows begin to rot. A very unsatisfied customer.

Ronda - Homeowner - from 2014


Pella Sliding Doors

Pella makes a wood clad sliding door that looks great at first, but then after a few years the cladding tends to separate from the glass. I'm not sure I can recommend them. When you're choosing a window, you have to look at three numbers; air infiltration, U-value and SHGC. Ask for the numbers from the window companies and do your own comparison. (A good contractor or window guy should be able to help you out with the comparison.) You'll find plenty of options better than Pella that last longer, look just as good, and don't cost nearly as much.

Anthony - Contractor - from 2012


Pella Windows Complaints

If you are looking at Pella's top end windows, you might do okay, but their vinyl windows and cheaper woods are not. They use a lot of rolled aluminum, too, which I hate. They have lousy customer service, in my opinion, the only way they make any money is because they never honor warranties. They didn't earn their reputation, they bought it with advertising budgets.

Anthony - Installer - from 2012






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General Pella Windows Reviews

Pella Hurricane Windows

What are your thoughts on PGT hurricane rated windows vs Pella? Thanks.

Glenn - Homeowner - from 2016

[Site Editor's Response]

Hi Glenn, generally Pella is considered a top brand in terms of wood windows, but a lower end (quality) brand in terms of vinyl. PGT is a Florida based company that specializes in impact or hurricane windows and they enjoy a solid reputation for manufacturing these types of windows. I suppose that is a long way of saying the PGT is the much better option in terms of hurricane windows.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2016


Pella Double Casement Windows

Two of my pella double casement windows with wood inside/vinyl outside are rotted at the bottom of the glass. Can I purchase replacements for just the portion of the window that moves/opens circled in red below and not the entire frame?

Outside of the house is vinyl sided with aluminum wrap around a series of four sets of side by side double casement window units, meaning that I would need quite a bit of exterior aluminum wrap replaced if I had to change out the entire window and frame.

Is there a different suggested fix? A way to repair the rotted bottom section of the glass casing? Thanks

Diane - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

Diane, once the wood is rooted, unfortunately there is very little you can do. You can call your local Pella rep or take pictures and send it to them, but I would imagine that there is no way to repair a portion of the frame. When replacing the windows, you would need to remove all of the exterior aluminum wrapping, which would certainly add to the cost of the repair.

One suggestion is to find a few local window companies to give you free project bids to replace the windows - even if you aren't ready to actually do the project. One, you are getting free professional advise. Two, you are getting several opinions that should, after the 3rd one, give you a pretty clear idea of what options are open to you.

It's possible that you could just replace the two windows that have issues with and the look of the new windows will be close enough to pass muster. I wish I had some better news or advise, but without seeing it in person, this is what I would do.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015


Pella vs Ply Gem Windows

I have 2 quotes for 6 sliders, one for Plygem Lifestyles with a local installer, and the other is Pella's 20 Series installed by Lowes. The price is about the same, so that doesn't matter, it's all about quality.

Jack - Homeowner - from 2012

[Contractor Response]

The Plygem is much much better. Ask for the stainless steel spacer, it makes a big difference. The PlyGem has a slightly flimsy sill (it's a second tier window) but as long as you aren't paying a premium price it isn't bad. The Pella just isn't worth it. I would suggest taking a look at Okna, Hi Mark, and Sunrise if you have time, but the Plygem is not bad.

Kendall - Contractor - from 2012

Read additional Okna windows reviews.


Pella vs Andersen Windows

I love Pellas, I'd definitely recommend them. They are highly rated with JD Powers and Associates and have been recognized by the Dept of Energy for having very efficient windows and other green practices. Andersens are decent, but nothing special, and they have so many lines that it can get confusing. Marvin is good, too, pretty close to Pella.

Steve - Builder - from 2008






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