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Sunrise Windows Reviews

Read 32 Sunrise windows reviews on their Essentials, Verde, Vanguard & Restorations series and find out what contractors and homeowners think about their quality and customer service. Click for additional information on Sunrise window prices.

Editor's Sunrise Windows Reviews

Sunrise Windows And Doors is a top vinyl window company, comparable in quality and price to Okna and Soft-Lite windows. Their entry-level Essentials Series uses a different extrusion from their standard window and honestly customers should consider stretching to get their standard window frame, which is an excellent value for the money.

All of the upgraded Sunrise models, including the Verde, Vanguard and Restorations are essentially upgrades to this standard extrusion. Their high end Restorations Series is one of the top rated vinyl windows that money can buy. Sunrise is based out of Michigan and they have strong distribution in the area and in many of the Eastern States (as far south as New Orleans, you literally can't get much further south than this!) Unfortunately, Sunrise windows are not available in the western states.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015

Have a question for our site editors, Dane or Tim? Email them and let them answer your specific project questions. Make sure to include your email address so they can get back to you directly (we never use or sell your email, we promise.)

Sunrise Windows vs Wasco

We are looking at replacing windows in our home and came across your site. We are looking at two different companies, Sunrise, which we have learned more about through your site, thank you!, and a local company here in SE Wisconsin called Wasco. (More on Wasco windows prices.) Do you have any recommendations between the two? We are not sure of the series being recommended by Sunrise and intend to find out. By our initial research it seems the Wasco window may be a step above the Sunrise series. We are looking at double hung, sliders if that helps. Thanks for any opinion you may be able to offer. If it helps we are replacing windows that are original (think 1960's!), so really any replacement will be a step up, we just want to investigate all options.

John - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

I would say Sunrise is better than Wasco, in general, but of course it depends on the actual model window, glass package and upgrades you opt for. Both of these brands make solid vinyl windows, so I think you would be well served by either window brand - just don't go with their entry level model, upgrade to their mid range model.

The big comparison therefore would be the installation quality and how well they are putting in the windows. Is there one company that stands out in this regard? That is who I'd go with...Good luck!

Dane - Site Editor - from 2015

Sunrise V Class Windows vs Andersen 400

My builder sent me to his window supplier where I was shown VClass Windows made by Sunrise. All 3 chambers of the frame are foam filled, the meeting rail is fiber reinforced, the lever lock is recessed, and the double hung windows have an AI of .04. It uses their XL Edge Stainless Steel Spacer and LowE 366 glass. Sounds very similar to the Sunrise Restorations series except VClass does not have fiber reinforced vertical sash members.

Have you heard of VClass Windows? I am trying to decide between VClass, Andersen 400, and Pella fiberglass.

[Site Editor's Response]

Bill, I have heard of the V class window, however I have not heard much. So I took a look at their website, and it sounds like you were spot on in terms of the features and components that the V class includes. It looks as if there are two different options, one is a real wood interior and the other is a wood laminate option. You may want to take a look at how these compare, see if the local rep has samples of each. I tend not to recommend wood windows, unless you really are passionate about how good the wood windows look. I only say this because wood tends to expand and contract, although the plywood backing of the V class window is actually a positive since plywood has a crosshatch design that reduces the amount of contraction and expansion that will happen over the years.

Wood windows typically carry a 10 to 20 year warranty, whereas vinyl will almost always carry a lifetime warranty. In addition, wood windows will typically not offer the same performance numbers (due to the organic material and the expansion contraction issue) as a solid vinyl window and they require more maintenance. I would get in contact with sunrise to find out how good that laminate looks, which is a nice alternative because you are dealing with a faux wood that can look quite realistic but does not have the same issues that wood often does.

The Pella fiberglass window or Impervia model is, in my opinion, a step below other fiberglass windows such as the Marvin Infinity or even the Marvin Integrity. I find the Impervia feels a bit flimsy in my hands compared to other comparably priced models.

I happen to really like the Anderson 400 wood window, especially the Woodwright model as opposed to the Narrowline. However, this is also a wood window and carries the very same downsides that any wood window does. Having said that, in terms of wood windows I rate the Anderson 400 at the top of the pack.

I would be curious to see how the Anderson 400 and The V class sunrise window compare in terms of price, I would have to assume that the V class would be 20% to 25% less. If it were me, where budget always tends to rank high on my list, I would probably rate them in this order; the Sunrise VClass, Anderson 400 and then the Pella.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2015

Sunrise Restorations Quote

I'm replacing 26 windows/17 double hungs (3 twinned), 4 quarter and 2 half circles. Single story home, brick exterior/drywall returns. Restorations dealer quote was $33000 for all white double pane windows (and painful to sit through). Seems high to me, or is that about right?

Ralph - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

Ralph, honestly, without more details I can't say whether the quote is high or not. I think the best way to tell is to get 2 or 3 more bids - they shouldn't be too painful - was the salesman doing a hard sell or something? The Restoration is their most expensive window, so there are other less expensive vinyl windows out there that you can also look at. Are any of these manufacturers available in your area, if so, give them a call and get some additional bids and compare the quotes.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015

Sunroom Windows Questions

We would like to have our screen porch enclosed keep elements (rain, snow, dust, allergens) from coming in and increase the usability of our space, however, we also do not want to make this into a full addition. We have received 3 estimates (so far). 2 came back with sunroom recommendations and the 3rd came back with a recommendation of installation of Sunrise windows.

Our intent is to be able to extend the time frame of this space (earlier in spring, later into fall\winter) and create a space that our 3 year old can extend into when we can't physically be outside with him (we live on a busy corner). I understand that naturally any window will allow for some "greenhouse" effect to warm the space and we are even considering a baseboard space heater only to extend the time frame, not to make it usable in true winter temps. Based on the conversation with the contractor and the research I have been able to do (thanks largely to your website which was very informative!) I am thinking he is recommending the Sunrise Restoration Windows (he referenced low-e glass, argon gas and a smaller profile).

Several questions:

1. Are Sunrise windows a good option for our solution? Or is there another line of window you might recommend? (more sunroom windows reviews)
2. Is there a Sunrise line that is better for this solution in order to balance cost? (your website mentions increased energy efficiency for Restoration, but we are using it on and uninsulated room)
3. Insulated glass vs tempered glass? (what is really needed? want to make sure our 3 year old is safe)
4. Will our planned usage affect the life of the windows or warranty?
5. Anything else we should consider?

Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Short the purchase of the home, this would be our first big expenditure.

Nick - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

Ryan, sorry for the delay in my response, I was spending the week with my kids so I have been a bit out of touch.

1. and 2. So, Sunrise vinyl windows are an excellent brand and the Restoration line is very good. The Verde and Vanguard models are also very good and should be a bit cheaper, but not always (some contractors get solid pricing on the Restoration line that is pretty close to these two other models, which are actually not THAT different from the Restoration model). The standard Sunrise frame, with their basic low-e glass would probably work fine, but it's not going to provide the same quality over time as the Restoration. From a long term value, I would say stretch to the Restoration and insist on a good quality install.

3. A standard low-e glass is fine. Laminated or tempered glass is not necessary, unless you require a hurricane or impact type window for the coast. The laminated option also provides some increase in soundproofing qualities, but nothing too substantial.

4. Using the space as a sunroom will not have any effect on the warranty or the life of the window.

5. The only other issue I can think of is whether you might want to consider a higher SHGC on the glass to allow in more heat during these cooler months in order to extend the time period that you can use the sunroom each year. Ask your contractor - I assume he knows the Sunrise rep - if this makes sense (perhaps not).

Good luck with the project and with your 3 year old!

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015

Sunrise Ultra Plus Windows

Your website is very helpful, thanks. I have two questions for you. First question: for the Sunrise window, I can only find the Ultra-U Plus, Ultra-U Plus 12, Ultra-U Plus8 (3 panes), Ultra-U Plus10 glass systems. What are these options related to Sunrise Verde, Vanguard, or Restorations models (no information in sunrise web site)? What is the difference between these two sets of model.

My quote question between soft-lite and Sunrise. I got quote from Soft-lite LS Solar Lowe Double Pane with Super Space with $10100, and Sunrise Ultra-U Plus12 with interior Low E coating with $11000. The Sunrise Interior Low E Coating is a new option for Sunrise windows. Soft-Lite LS with U:.27, SHGC:.18, VT:.41, AL:.02 and the Sunrise with : U:.24, SHGC:.22, VT:.48, AL:.04. Please give me your comments, and help me to make my decision. Thanks

Ning - Homeowner - from 2015

[Site Editor's Response]

Hi Ning, thanks for the question. The Ultra-U Plus is a dual glazed window glass system that is an energy efficient upgrade, which should be available on any and all available Sunrise models in your area (often dealers have access to most but not all models). There are a number of options, U-8, U-10, U-12 - the numbers specifies how many layers or coatings are used in the glass making process.

I would say that the standard Sunrise frame window is good and the upgraded models that you refer to (Verde, Vanguard, or Restorations models) are all very good.

As to the comparison between Soft-Lite and Sunrise, both of the performance number sets you are looking at are excellent. Assuming the installation quality is the same, I would save $1000 and go with the Soft-Lite window costs. I don't think the new glass system is worth that price. But, focus on the installation as much as the window itself and make sure you are getting a quality install and labor warranty on the installation.

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015

Sunrise Latitude Windows

I am getting bids on Sunrise Latitude windows for my home and would like to know your opinion on them. They are a newer model so I am struggling to find someone that has any dealings with them. I live in Colorado at around 6500 feet and apparently the Latitude windows are made for higher altitude and don't need breather tubes on the trip up since the glass is supposed to be thicker and can take the pressure change and the seals apparently can handle it. Can anyone confirm or deny this claim. Thanks

John - Homeowner - from 2015

[Contractor Response]

John, the Sunrise Latitude is, I believe one of the upgraded glass option that makes for a more energy efficient window. Have you spoken with a Sunrise rep in your area to confirm that the Latitude glass is up to the task - I honestly don't know enough specifically about the Latitiude glass to confirm or deny. Assuming they say yes, I would ask for several references in high altitude homes that you can quickly call and speak with. I would also check into Amerimax, Okna, and Gerkin Windows, which I know makes a Solar glass that is built for high elevations.

I would definitely recommend working with local window reps who have years of experience putting in replacement windows in high elevations such as yours. I know that using breather tubes can sometimes void the window warranty so this is a question I would ask everyone you get a bid from.

As you say, there are potential problems with windows made at low altitudes and then shipped to higher altitudes (typically anything over 6000 ft.) The increase in altitude can cause the window pane to bow (due to greater seal pressure at the lower altitude). Also, windows at high altitude can be subjected to UV degradation (although this is much much less of a problem with today's vinyl windows, especially with higher end manufacturers).

I feel like I didn't answer your question, but hopefully this gives you some ideas of where to go from here. Please let us know what you find so that we can help other homeowners looking for replacement windows at high altitudes in the future.

Dane - Site Editor - from 2015

Read more Gerkin windows reviews.

Sunrise vs Simonton Pro Finish Windows

Hello, I know nothing about windows and we need to replace some windows in my home . I don't want or need top of the line, but don't want cheap windows that will be a problem. We have gotten some estimates for 8 double hung windows (bedrooms) and a large picture window with a double hung on each side. We live in Illinois and we also live on a busy road.

These are the brands we have gotten offered:

Ply Gem
Simonton Profinish builder series or 5500 series
Sun View by Lindsay Windows

Sunrise Windows

How would you rate these windows? Thank you so much for your help!!!!

Theresa - Homeowner - from 2015

[Contractor Response]

Theresa, good for you for getting 4 bids, that's a good start. Okay, the best of the bunch is the Sunrise, although the Sunrise Essentials windows are their lower end model and I would stick with their standard frame or any upgraded model from here - Verde, Vanguard, Restorations. Whoever gave you the bid should have access to some if not all of these options, but their standard Sunrise frame is very good. I know nothing about Sun View windows, I did take a look at the Lindsey website, but it didn't provide me with any energy efficiency numbers or specific features on the window so I really can't comment.

Ply Gem makes a number of window series, their builder series is not very good, their Contractor series is okay and their Premium Series is good (probably on par with the Sunrise Standard Series). The Simonton Pro Finish Builder is not very good (they do have a Contractor Model and Master Model in the Pro Finish Series that are both decent, not fantastic, but decent Simonton quality). The Simonton 5500 Reflections series is quite a nice window (see if you can get a bid on the 9800 Impressions Series if they carry it, this is quite nice as well.)

I would take the Sunrise and Simonton 5500 quotes and try to get the prices down on each as much as possible (sometimes by telling them that you have several quotes for the same project for $500 less etc. and ask what they can come down to in terms of price.) Good Luck!

Tim - Site Editor - from 2015

Sunrise Ultra Plus Or Soft Lite Element

We can't decide between Sunrise Ultra Plus or Soft Lite Element Replacement Windows. We got quotes from both companies, Soft Lite being more expensive, but not enough for us to not consider them. Both companies have a solid reputation for installation, any thoughts?

Amanda - Homeowner - from 2015

[Contractor Response]

Amanda, both of these companies are very good and the windows you've selected are both excellent. If you feel like the installation is the same from both companies, I would probably go with the Sunrise Ultra Plus for the simple reason that it's less expensive. Unless there is something about the Element that you love such as the overall look of it, but honestly once the windows are in, you probably won't notice the difference.

Dane - Contractor - from 2015

Sunrise Windows vs Accent

I am looking to replace two patio doors, with ones that have internal blinds. Sunrise and Accent Windows are two that I have available through local dealers. Then there's Home Depot, but I've read of concerns about their product. I live in W Colorado, very dry climate. Have a lot of summer sun on side of house where doors would be. Appreciate any input.

Mary - Homeowner - from 2015

[Editor's Response]

Mary, I've never heard of Accent windows, but I did look up their numbers on the website and was very impressed with their energy efficiency ratings. Having said that, I would usually recommend going with a bigger company like Sunrise because there is a greater likelihood that they will be around in 15 years should something happen to one or more of your windows. This assumes that you like the Sunrise dealer in your area and they have a good installation track record. By the way, you can call up Sunrise's main office and ask about that specific dealer and see what they say (they are biased, but you can sometimes read between the lines). The Sunrise standard window is quite a nice product.

It sounds like your have two good options so project bid and price should be the next thing you compare. You may to consider getting one more bid just to see how it compares to the other two.

Sunrise or Pella Wood Clad

I have a bid on Pella Pro Line wood windows. They are very nice looking windows, but I'm worried about rotting, which I've read in numerous forums happens to wood. There is no sealant in the corners and I'm worried that moisture would get in. One of my neighbors just got a bid for Sunrise windows - not sure which models, but I was wondering whether they are good or not?

Brian - Homeowner - from 2014

[Contractor Response]

I've installed Pella windows going on nearly 30 year and have all the training certification etc. I love wood clad windows, but they have some downsides to be sure - rotting and mediocre rating at the top of the list. Honestly, the Sunrise vinyl window will be a better option in both of these regards (perhaps not their entry level window, but the standard frame and all other upgraded models.) As far as wood windows go, I think the big manufacturers need to stand behind their products and warranty their frames and sashes on the wood windows for 20 years. Then you would provide some confidence to the consumer.

Wayne - Contractor - from 2014

[Contractor Response]

I think the Sunrise is probably your best bet, but I agree with you on how nice the ProLine series looks. You will always have a better warranty on inorganic substrates such as fiberglass and vinyl as opposed to wood. Sunrise makes a good window - not their low end window, but everything else.

Holland - Contractor - from 2014

Sunrise Verde vs The Restoration Series

I was looking at the Verde and Restoration series from Sunrise. The Verde has some sagging issues, it's covered under the warranty but still a lot of hassle, but they offer a reinforcement option and I'd definitely get that if you go with Verde. The Restorations is a little bit higher quality with more bells and whistles. Both of them are good options, though. They are equal enough that I'd choose between them based on the dealer and installer you like better.

Steven - Contractor - from 2012

Sunrise Elements Reviews

I think the Sunrise Elements is a really good window, I like it even more than the LS. It has a lot of upgrades and options available, and it has a .01 air infiltration rate, which is pretty much impossible to beat. Assuming that both options involve a good installer and the price is similar, I'd say the Elements is slightly better.

Will - Contractor - from 2012

Sunrise Windows vs Polaris Windows

Sunrise, HiMark, Polaris, and Softlite are considered to be a kind of elite, status brand for vinyl windows. I'm not sure if that means they are really better than the big players like Pella, Andersen, or Marvin. I think a lot depends on the dealer you get then from, since that determines most of your customer service. The dealer here that pushes Simonton is ok, and another one sells Alside. I've dealt mostly with the one who sells only Sunrise. They've been around a long time, and I have never had a problem with them, but not long ago they were bought by a new owner so I'm not sure how that's going to go.

Macky - Installer - from 2012

Verde vs Energex

I'm looking at the Sunrise Verde, along with similar priced products from American Window and Homeguard Innovations, which are both local companies here in Indiana. I was curious what everyone thought abt these three. One company I talked to who sells all of these windows told me he thought Homeguard and the Verde were about equal, while the American Window was a notch below these two.

Aimee - Homeowner - from 2012

[Contractor Response]

The Verde is similar in design to the Energex Innovations, but the Verde has lots more features. Now the NEW Elite series from Affinity is a totally different story, that is a great window. They are a step up from the old profiles from that company.

Robbie - Contractor - from 2012

Verde vs Energex

We starting looking at windows and so far have received 3 bids. The Alside Sheffield price is $410 per window installed, the Sunrise is $650 per window installed and the Soft-Lite prices are $700 per window installed. We might try to get a few of the Sunrise or the Soft-Lite and just see how they work and then go from there (although the companies don't seem to like this). I just don't see how the windows can be 100s of dollars more for what looks like the same thing. We are also considering doing Larson interior storms that run around $100 per window.

Bennie - Homeowner - from 2012

[Contractor Response]

I hear this sort of thing all the time, that these vinyl windows look the same so they must work basically the same. The Alside Sheffield is a poorly made window, from design to the glazing to the components. This might mean you have to replace them in 10 years. The Sunrise and Soft-Lite (granted I don't know what models you are looking at) windows are well made and designed and you might have to replace them after 20 years. If we are looking only at economics of it all, the Sunrise and Soft-Lite is actually a better buy. Plus it's a pain to have your windows redone. Do it right the first time and get the long term value. Just my two cents.

Holland - Contractor - from 2012

Sunrise Windows vs Marvin

Marvin windows are widely considered one of the best brands on the market. While there are some differences from one Marvin line to the next, they are almost always going to win out when compared to any other brand with similar features. The Sunrise Restoration is one of the few that beats it with way lower air infiltration numbers. One factor many people overlook is what they numbers are on a 10 year old window as opposed to one that's sitting in a showroom. There's a lot of debate as to what has the best stats after a few years of use. The Marvins are pretty much going to make anyone happy, with consistent performance and good customer support. Oknas and Sunrise are good, too, if for some reason you don't love the Marvins. When it comes down to it, to get a good window you're going to have to pay for it, and the bargain brands just don't perform.

Steve - Industry Guru - from 2011

Read more Okna windows reviews.

Sunrise vs Preservation Windows

Alside Preservation has a bulky frame and snap in sill that I'm not a big fan of. If the decision is between the Preservation window and the Sunrise standard, I would not hesitate to go with the Sunrise. They make a nice durable vinyl window that looks nice and uses a more narrow frame. The Preservation is pretty similar in design and construction with the Alside Sheffield window, which is not the best build window in the business. Sunrise vinyl windows are going to be a better long term investment for you and your family in my opinion.

Michael - Installer - from 2011

Sunrise vs Seaway Windows

I have project bids from Sunrise and Seaway windows and the price per window is only like $50 difference, the Sunrise being more expensive. However, I feel like the Seaway warranty is better so it makes it a tough choice. Any input on these companies?

Brenda - Homeowner - from 2011

[Contractor's Response]

Sunrise makes some very nice windows and for my money is one of the top 3 or 4 vinyl window manufacturers in the field. I'm not very familiar with the Seaway products, but I did visit the website and I was impressed with the list of features and the performance numbers on the Ovation. I will say that the numbers were based on a triple pane glass so I would be interested to know how the standard double hung with dual pane and argon fills fare, this would be a more fair set of numbers to put on the site. I think if you get a good bid from them and feel better about their installers than the Sunrise dealer, go with them. If not, stick with the tried and true and go with the Sunrise.

Scot C. - Contractor - from 2011

Sunrise Casement Windows

For casements, I'd take a look at Okna, Softlite, Sunrise, and Gorell. One of Sunrise's new lines has the thinnest profile I've ever seen on a casement, which gives you more glass and more natural light if that's what you're after. Keep in mind that you can usually order vinyl windows with a wood grain finish, but if you buy a white one and stain it you won't get the same results. If it's in your budget, take a look at Milgard and Marvin fiberglass windows.

Steven - Virginia contractor 2011

Sunrise vs Soft-Lite Windows

I really like both Soft-Lite and Sunrise Elements. SoftLites have fiberglass insulation stapled to the jambs and head, which I think is stupid. For an insane fee they'll give you a foam insulating wrap, which is better, or low-expansion foam, which is the best choice. Personally, if your openings are level and square I think you do better to order a window that fits nice and tight, with just enough room for some shims. If your jambs are plumb and sills are level, you can usually get a good fit without doing anything too crazy. If you have really large openings, then you might need something a little more complex. Sunrise windows have a flat jamb and the foam tape they use sticks out a little. If you anchor them well, then spray foam insulation under the sills you can then seal the frame with silicone or something similar.

You also need to check out the extrusions and framing before ordering your windows. Some have a groove that they fit in, and I prefer leaving a little extra space and using spray foam to ensure a good fit. Foam rolls can help with a loose fit, they help get a tight seal and insulate too. I like have multiple lines of defense against water and air infiltration. A good seal, plenty of insulation, and a tight fit are all important. Ask your installer how they handle all of this, there are plenty of different ways to make sure a window is sealed and well installed.

Mike - Installer - from 2011

Read more Soft-Lite windows reviews.

Sunrise vs PGT Windows

I like the PGT but they don't make a triple pane. They're comparable to the Sunrise, but I think the PGT looks better. I do like the MaxEdge Spacer on the Sunrise better. They have similar ratings, so I'd go with either one. Between these two the price and installation would be the deciding factor.

Evan - Installer - from 2011

Restoration vs Harvey Tribute

We're eventually redoing all of our windows, which will include standard double hungs plus some smaller ones for the the bathrooms, a few basement hoppers and a slider. We're going to only do the upstairs for now, but we'll need the same line in a year or so for the rest. So far, we have a quote from Sunrise Restorations, $465 for double hungs, $420 for the kitchen slider and $250 for the hoppers. The Harvey Tributes are $490, $450, and $390 for the same windows. I'm not sure which to go with?

Tina - Homeowner - from 2011

[Contractor Response]

The Sunrise is a good window. If that is really the installed price then it's a really good deal. Harvey isn't in the same class as Sunrise.

Barry - Installer - from 2011

Sunrise Windows vs Simonton

I'm trying to decide between the Simonton 5500, the Sunrise, or CertainTeed Bryn Mawr III. Sunrise has a great warranty and I like the finished look of them. They have clean welds and are probably the best window overall. The Simonton has two lines (the Reflections and the Impressions) that I like and I'll probably end up with one of those. The price is good, and with a few upgrades they are about as good as the Sunrise. The Bryn Mawr looks good, but I've heard a lot about their quality control issues recently and that makes me reluctant to buy anything from CertainTeed.

Mike - Contractor in Delaware - from 2011

Restorations vs Ideal Majestic

Recently I had a chance to look at the Ideal Majestic and Sunrise Restorations together. Honestly, you wouldn't even believe they're the same thing. Ideal uses a cheap, low-grade vinyl. The seals are thin, the frame and rails are flimsy. Sunrise uses thicker, sturdier materials that won't wear out. Ideal might throw around good AI numbers, but they use such cheap materials that in a year or two, you might as well leave your windows open. They aren't made to last forever and if you're going to be in your house in 5 years then don't waste your time and money, go with a higher quality to start with.

Carey - Contractor - from 2010

Sunrise vs Ply Gem

I like Sunrise a lot, I think they're one of the best on the market. I wish I worked with them, but I rarely have the chance to. They've been around a long time. They definitely beat Great Lakes, Plygem, or just about any other brand. I'm not familiar with Seaways but they seem decent, but Sunrise is always a good bet.

Harry - Contractor - from 2010

Good Quality Patio Doors

Sunrise Restorations, Vanguard, and the regular Sunrise are very similar. Some of the features that are options on the basic model are standard on the higher priced lines. They have fiber core reinforcements, which is nice for some installations but unnecessary for others. You might get more for your money if you get the basic Sunrise with triple panes and then add the features that you want. They do have a really great patio door, equal to Softlite, HiMark, or Okna. Pella, RBA, and Champion are overpriced and overrated.

Daniel - Contractor - from 2010

Sunrise Essentials Reviews

I've only installed the Sunrise Essentials windows one time, but I didn't like them. It took six or seven shims in the jambs to keep the top sash from falling. The other Sunrise products I've seen haven't had any problems, and it could have been a fluke that the Essentials were so bad, but I think they're just a low-value window for dealers and builders to push when budget is an issue. The sashes, balance system, locks, everything is different from the regular Sunrise windows.

Mike - Installer - from 2009

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